DIZZINESS — A Resource

Navigating the Unknown – Fears and Pleasures of Dizziness

A three-day programme with Austrian, Swiss, British, American, Danish, German, and Israeli artists and scientists at the CCA – Center for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv. 'Dizziness' is a condition of the body and/or the mind indicating a deviation from what has been so far conceived as normal or usual. As a condition, 'Dizziness' forces a re-rearrangement of the current navigational system. But how does one navigate the unknown? Read More.

In Conversation with
François Jullien
Making Ambiguity Fertile is the Present Mission of Thought

At this stage of the “just before”, of the potential, the ambiguous, the non-separation – the work of art avoids to come about, to take place because if it takes place, it is only this and not as well that anymore, it becomes exclusive. The great oeuvre keeps itself at work, because it keeps itself at this stage of the “just before”, “upstream” of a definitive actualisation, which would follow its definition. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 30.09.2015

Karoline Feyertag
Inside/Outside and The Ground beneath Our Feet
with Comments by Feyertag,
Anderwald + Grond

Only since contemporary philosophy could compossibility also mean that opposites, several mutually contradictory worlds or heterogeneous truths, are possible within the same universe and without necessarily entailing separation, distinction or any dichotomy between them. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 22.09.2015

Communitas

The community isn't a mode of being, much less a ‘making’ of the individual subject. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.09.2015

Ambiguity

From ambigō ("wander; waver, hesitate") Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.09.2015

In conversation with
Harald Katzmair
Instigate Un-Balance

It’s always the same: the point is that on the one hand we are in danger of burning up, of evaporating, of going too fast, of dissolving, and on the other hand we are in danger of freezing, rigidifying, of becoming mummified and unable to move. Dizziness contains within it both extremes. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 07.09.2015

Karoline Feyertag
Get Entangled!
On Positions and Momentums

Why have we always been thinking in “straight lines” when Lucretius had already observed the swerve as a permanent change of motion? Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

Position and Momentum in Quantum Theory

In quantum mechanics, momentum is defined as an operator on the wave function. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle defines limits on how accurately the momentum and position of a single observable system can be known at once. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

Quantum Entanglement

Two entangled particles are linked in such a way that the state of one of them determines the state of the other. Have you ever heard how identical twins say they can tell when the other one has been hurt? I’ve no idea how true this is for humans but with particles, that’s kind of what entanglement is like. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

Superposition in Quantum Theory

When we are not looking, the world is acting completely crazy. But as soon as we turn around, it pretty much acts as normal. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle

Throughout the main body of his original 1927 paper, written in German, Heisenberg used the word, "Ungenauigkeit" ("indeterminacy"), to describe the basic theoretical principle. Only in the endnote did he switch to the word, "Unsicherheit" ("uncertainty") Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

The Observer Effect
in Quantum Theory

When behaving as waves, [particles] can simultaneously pass through several openings in a barrier and then meet again at the other side of the barrier. This "meeting" is known as interference. Strange as it may sound, interference can only occur when no one is watching. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 08.05.2015

Mapping Delirium
Part 2

The typically Western notion of “we’re taking drugs” just reflects the delusions of power with which we approach fellow beings that are superior to us. I don’t take drugs, the drugs take me with them. And it’s not my decision whether I am swept along by it or not, but I can decide what level of humility I display toward it. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 13.04.2015

In conversation with
Juha van ’t Zelfde
Dread – The Dizziness of Freedom

I think it is this cognitive override by physical intelligence, or physical knowing and thinking… I am interested in that, because there I encounter my vertigo as well. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 10.04.2015

Karoline Feyertag
On the Threshold
in between Motion and Standstill.

How can we utilise dizziness in the sense of ‘staring into the abyss’ as a stimulus for the fundamental act of philosophising? Is it really the limit, threshold, limen and aporia that incite thinking? Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 15.01.2015

The “Turning Point” of Paradoxes

Paradoxes are comparable with aporias as explained in Aristotle’s book on Topics. In another text, Aristotle concretises the problem of two opposite motions in one specific moment that is “numerically one” and “theoretically two”. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 15.01.2015

Metis

Wherever indeterminacy (apeiras) reigns, wherever there are no limits and no directions, whenever we are trapped, encircled or caught in inextricable bonds, it is, according to Detienne and Vernant, Metis who intervenes, who discovers stratagems, expedients, tricks, ruses, machinations, mechane and techne which allow us to move from the absence of limits to determinacy, from darkness to light. The kinship between Poros and Metis provides an indissoluble link between journey, transition, crossing, resourcefulness, expediency, techne, light and limits (peiras). Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 15.01.2015

Limen

Related to the notion of limit and threshold, limen opens up a slightly different semantic field. Its etymology is related to the Latin limus that means “transverse, oblique”. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 15.01.2015

Limit and Threshold

Both notions seem crucial when thinking of the catalysts for dizziness. Reaching one’s own limit makes one dizzy. Crossing a threshold, which is understood as a symbol for ending something and beginning something new, could begin within dizziness but also end with lucidity. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 15.01.2015

Apeiron

The Greek word peirar means “end, limit” and peras means “end, limit, boundary”. The word a-peiron is the negation of these meanings. In Hesiod and other classical Greek texts peras mainly describes the end of the known world. Read More.
Share on Facebook, Tweet – Posted on 14.01.2015